Your professional provider of Domiciliary Care Services throughout the region.

May 24th, 2018

We’ve all been enjoying the warmer weather recently, with the first May Bank Holiday breaking records as temperatures soared.

But it is important to take precautions in hot weather, and this is advice we pass on to our team and also to our elderly clients, who can be particularly vulnerable when temperatures climb.

Sunflower

Tips for keeping safe in the warm weather

First, keep an eye on the weather forecasts, so you know what to prepare for if you are going to be out and about. The Met Office will raise an alert if there is a high chance that an average temperature of 30C by day and 15C overnight will occur over the following two to three days. These temperatures can have a significant effect on people’s health if they last for at least two days and the night in between.

If a heatwave arrives, then the following will help you to keep cool:

  • Keep out of the sun during the hottest part of the day, usually 11am to 3pm
  • Keep rooms cool, by closing curtains or shades
  • Take cool baths or showers and splash cold water on your face
  • Drink cold drinks regularly, such as water or squash. Avoid alcohol and caffeinated drinks
  • Wear loose clothing
  • If you go out, wear a sunhat, sunglasses and sunscreen.

If you have elderly neighbours or relatives, please do pop in and check they are OK and whether they need anything. Going out in a heatwave is not advisable for them, so you may be able to assist by getting in provisions.

The NHS website has lots more information about staying safe and well in hot weather, which you can check out here.

This blog was written by Rachel Houghton, Service Manager. If you have a relative who you think would benefit from DoCare’s services, or would like assistance yourself, please get in touch. If you are interested in a rewarding career as a support worker, we would love to hear from you – please give us a call or you can apply online.

May 21st, 2018

This week, from May 21-27, is Dementia Action Week. Organised by the Alzheimer’s Society, it takes place every May and is a way of raising awareness of this condition, which affects so many people and their families.

Dementia Action Week

At DoCare, where we support older people so they can remain living in their own homes, we are all too aware of dementia and how it can take its toll. Many of our clients live with dementia, and it is hard not just for them but also for their loved ones.

Our hard-working team of dedicated support workers have specialist training, to help them better understand and meet the needs of our clients with dementia. We are all striving to make every day a better day for our them.

More about Dementia Action Week

The Alzheimer’s Society is asking everyone to take actions big or small to improve the lives of people affected by dementia – we all have a role to play.

In the UK, one person develops dementia every three minutes. Yet too many people living with dementia face the condition alone and excluded from society.

The Alzheimer’s Society is leading the movement for change. The charity is determined to create a dementia-friendly UK where people with dementia are included and supported to live the lives they want.

But the charity can’t do this alone. It wants everybody to take a small action to make a difference. So how can you help?

Here are some ideas:

  • Host a fundraising event
  • Display a poster
  • Look out for events in your area and attend them
  • Become a ‘dementia friend
  • Offer support to those with dementia and their families

At DoCare, we’ve held a Cupcake Day coffee morning and we also sell homemade greetings cards to help raise funds. Every little helps, to coin a phrase.

This blog was written by Kate Townsend, DoCare Field Manager. If you have a relative who you think would benefit from DoCare’s services, or would like assistance yourself, please get in touch. If you are interested in a rewarding career as a support worker, we would love to hear from you – please give us a call or you can apply online.

May 16th, 2018

There are many events throughout the year that aim to raise the profile of a particular issue, and one that is taking place this week and that has struck a chord with the team here at DoCare is Dying Awareness Week.Dying matters

Every year in May, the organisation Dying Matters hosts the awareness week, with the aim of encouraging people to talk about dying, death and bereavement.

Why talk about dying?

There is a saying that there are only two certainties in life, death and taxes, yet as a nation we seem to shy away from the topic of death.

When we are young, death seems a very long way off, but as we get older it is almost inevitable that we will think of our ultimate demise from time to time, but we still don’t talk about it. Yet the only way to let people know your views about what should happen when you die – for example, how you want your funeral to be conducted, how you would like your estate to be distributed – is by letting people know during your lifetime.

One way is through making a will, and yet one in three people die without writing one, which can lead to upset, confusion and potentially conflict between those you leave behind.

Even if you do make a will, don’t leave it at that; talk to your loved ones about death and dying. It’s a difficult conversation, but will make decisions easier in the long-run.

Dying Matters’ mission is to “help people talk more openly about dying, death and bereavement, and to make plans for the end of life”. The organisation concedes this will involve a fundamental change in society in which dying, death and bereavement are seen and accepted as the natural part of everybody’s life cycle. “Changes in the way society views dying and death have impacted on the experience of people who are dying and bereaved. Our lack of openness has affected the quality and range of support and care services available to patients and families. It has also affected our ability to die where or how we would wish.”

At DoCare, it is our privilege to support a number of our clients who are reaching the end of their lives, and many of our team undergo specialist training in palliative care to ensure we provide the best service possible. We can see at first-hand how important it is for families to be with their loved ones and how it makes a difference if the wishes of the person who is dying are made know.

We applaud Dying Matters and hope this week’s awareness events will raise the profile of this difficult topic.

This blog was written by Una Mills, DoCare Director. If you have a relative who you think would benefit from DoCare’s services, or would like assistance yourself, please get in touch. If you are interested in a rewarding career as a support worker, we would love to hear from you – please give us a call or you can apply online.